An analysis of the jacksonian revolution by robert v remini

Remini explains the Age of Jackson, a turbulent era in American history, but more importantly the man behind the revolution himself, Andrew Jackson. Inmany people were shocked at the fact that Jackson was running for President. After an era of great presidents and leaders such as Washington and Jefferson, a General from Tennessee was now running for the presidency of the United States.

An analysis of the jacksonian revolution by robert v remini

Table of Contents Brief Overview Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States, is perhaps more relevant today than most of the other Presidents of the early nineteenth century. When Jackson was finally elected, he pushed to have the Electoral College abolished and railed against life tenure for government workers.

Throughout his life, Jackson was criticized for his steadfast opinions and autocratic manner, but he nonetheless proved himself a savvy and thoughtful politician. It was only after he had fully considered his options that he made a decision—once that decision had been made, however, he pursued it relentlessly, gradually grinding away at his opponents until he got what he needed.

In doing so, he helped modernize the nation and forever define his term of office as the mini-Enlightenment now known as Jacksonian America. Andrew Jackson, son of Irish immigrants, Andrew and Elizabeth Jackson, was born in the backwoods of the Carolinas—what was then considered the frontier of America.

Jackson resisted, and without a father figure, he became a wild young boy who liked to bully his peers. The Revolutionary War affected the teenage Jackson in an intensely personal way, leaving him forever bitter towards the British.

When the war came to his area, his oldest brother, Hugh, volunteered to fight and died soon thereafter during the Battle of Stono Ferry. Jackson worked as an errand boy for the commander of the local patriot regiment, but nothing could have prepared him for the ordeal of being taken captive by British troops along with his other brother, Robert.

After both were severely wounded by the sword of a British officer, Jackson and his brother were herded into a prisoner-of-war camp where they contracted smallpox.

Thus, when the war ended, it left Jackson orphaned and alone. As Jackson grew older, he became engaged in a wild lifestyle of betting, horseracing and partying before eventually settling on law for a career.

He traveled west into the new Tennessee territory. After establishing himself as an able politician there, he rose quickly through the political ranks. When Tennessee joined the Union inJackson became a Congressman and was promoted to the Senate a year later. He soon found himself engaged in military affairs, and won the election to be Major General of the state militia in Throughout his time in Tennessee, he engaged in various duels when he felt someone had threatened his honor—even killing a man once.

From the SparkNotes Blog

When the War of began, it fell to Jackson to crush the Creek Indian tribe in a series of brutal battles in which the general gave no quarter to the Indians. Once the tribe had been almost extinguished, Jackson imposed a harsh treaty on the Indians, stripping them of most of their lands and rights.

Then he was ordered to help save the city of New Orleans from attack. His daring defense of the city exacted massive casualties on the British and made him a national hero. Two years later, Jackson—now a major general in the U. Army—received orders to put down Indian attacks near Spanish Florida.

His invasion of Spanish territory and his execution of two British nationals sparked an international incident—but he again successfully defeated the Indians.

President James Monroe appointed Jackson governor of Florida after it was bought from the Spanish, but Jackson resigned after only a few months to seek the Presidency. The elections of and stand as some of the dirtiest campaigns ever waged for the Presidency.

Jackson won the popular vote handily inbut, after failing to win a majority of the electoral vote, lost the Presidency in a runoff in the House of Representatives. Jackson quickly turned his attention to and won a solid victory in that year.

Jackson signed over ninety treaties with Indian tribes and moved them all west of the Mississippi—killing thousands in the process. Calhoun furthered the idea that a state could refuse to obey a federal law, "nullify it," if that state wanted to.

Jackson spent much of his eight years as President trying to destroy the national Bank, which had been chartered by Congress in as a national center for fiscal policy. Jackson felt that the Bank was an unfair monopoly and that it abused or might abuse its significant power—a power that had partly caused the disastrous Panic of Jackson went to great lengths to destroy the Bank, a crusade that almost cost him the presidency in and earned him an official censure by the Senate.

Brief Overview

Nonetheless, byhe had killed the Bank. Jackson left office in wildly popular.

An analysis of the jacksonian revolution by robert v remini

His appeal rose from his backwoods past: Furthermore, time and again he had shown that he would not be bullied, by the Senate or by foreign governments.

Jackson, meanwhile, retired to his family plantation in Tennessee, the Hermitage, where he died at age seventy-eight.Jan 01,  · In his inimitable style, Remini crafts a memorable portrait of Jackson: the young hellraiser and war hero; the stern judge; the determined campaigner; and, finally, the chief executive In his inimitable style, Remini crafts a memorable portrait of Jackson: the young hellraiser and war hero; the stern judge; the determined campaigner; and, finally, the chief executive of the people/5.

View The Jacksonian Revolution Remini from HISTORY AP US at Quaker Valley Hs. Article 24 Robert V Remird Robert 1.“ Rgmfni is professor ofkfsrary a! dag University q’fllinois Circle Carrion: in. Home» Lifestyle» History» The Jacksonian Revolution: Author Robert V.

Remini Explains the Age of Jackson The Jacksonian Revolution: Author Robert V. Remini Explains the Age of Jackson In the article, “The Jacksonian Revolution,” author Robert V.

Remini explains the Age of Jackson, a turbulent era in American history, but more importantly the man behind the revolution himself, Andrew Jackson. Article 24 The Jacksonian Revolution Robert V. Remini Rob~n V. &mini is prof~ssor of hisrory at rhL Urnvmiry of nlinois Circle Campus in leslutinsduphoenix.com author of a multivolume biography of And"w Jackson.

"What?" cried the outraged Nonh Car0- lina lady when she heaJd the dreadful. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Jacksonian Revolution at leslutinsduphoenix.com Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.

From The Community. Amazon Try Prime All. Go by Robert V. Remini. Change. Price: $ Write a review. See All Buying Options. Add to Wish List. It has been described as similar in analysis and perspective to the original volumes.

Other work The Jacksonian Era () Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union () Works by or about Robert V. Remini in libraries (WorldCat catalog) Appearances on C-SPAN.

Andrew Jackson by Robert V. Remini