Coming to conclusions

That first class meeting lay the groundwork for a semester of exploring new at least to me tools, sites, and media for crafting a digital publication. I had kept a blog before, but created this one for class specifically. I tried to combine reflections on class topics with topics that I would be interested in using for a blog. These included travel, literature, and the arts.

Coming to conclusions

In fact, some manufacturers actually tweak the display calibration for some countries to make sure that face colors come out just right for the local population.

We measured the skin color for a wide selection of people of all races and ethnic groups in our photo library using a spectroradiometer and a very accurately calibrated display. The results are shown in Figure 2. What is especially interesting and significant is how they all fall along a well defined narrow line of color for people of all races and ethic groups, from the lightest Caucasians to the darkest Africans which is perhaps not surprising given that we all just have varying degrees of melanin and blood capillaries.

Coming to conclusions

Note that we are measuring the actual underlying skin color chromaticity not the skin brightness. From this spectroradiometer data we defined three Reference Colors that Coming to conclusions describe the range of skin colors, which we then use to evaluate Skin Tone Color Accuracy.

We measure the accuracy of these Reference Colors for each display, which tells us how accurately the entire range of Skin Tones are reproduced. The numerical results are listed in Table 1 above and the individual data points for each display are shown in Figure 3b.

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What is particularly interesting and significant is that the Apple iPad Air 2 performs considerably better in Skin Tone Color Accuracy than Full Color Gamut Accuracy, while three of the other displays perform considerably worse in this critical region.

Organic Color Accuracy Most organic colors that occur in nature are heavily weighted in the red to green parts of the spectrum, which also encompasses browns, oranges, and yellows. This includes most foods, fruits, vegetables, and plants except flowers.

There are only a relatively small percentage of exceptions, Coming to conclusions as blueberries, egg plants, radishes, some plums, and purple cabbage, for example — just about everything else falls in the red, brown, orange, yellow, and green categories, which is a well defined and relatively small region of the human visual color space as shown in Figure 1.

In addition, humans have a much lower sensitivity to blue light. Most fruits have vibrant and saturated colors in order to help attract the attention of animals that eat and then scatter their seeds. We even evaluate the quality of most foods by their color.

Not surprisingly, these same food colors that are essential for our survival have also been incorporated and used to highlight and get our visual attention: Flowers, on the other hand, need to attract the attention of insects for pollination, whose vision is weighted towards the blue and ultraviolet portions of the spectrum, which accounts for the more varied range of colors in flowers that includes many saturated blues, purples, and violets.

In a similar fashion to Skin Tones, we measured the colors for a wide selection of colorful foods, fruits, vegetables, and plants but not flowers in our photo library using a spectroradiometer and a very accurately calibrated display.

The most saturated reds include tomatoes, strawberries, apples, and red peppers. The most saturated greens include chlorophyll leafs of all types, green peppers, and limes.

In between are oranges, carrots, lemons, and bananas. This range also includes cooked and uncooked meats. From this spectroradiometer data we defined a set of Reference Colors that accurately describe the range of these organic colors, which we then use to evaluate Organic Color Accuracy.

We measure the accuracy of these Reference Colors for each display, which tells us how accurately the entire range of Organic Colors are reproduced. As discussed above, these same saturated food colors are also common in everyday inorganic objects. The numerical results are listed in Table 1 above and the individual data points for each display are shown in Figure 3c.

The Apple iPad Air 2 again performs considerably better in Organic Color Accuracy than the Full Color Gamut Accuracy, while three of the other displays perform slightly worse in this especially important color region.

The iPhone 6 Plus performs slightly better and the Galaxy Note 4 maintains its excellent color accuracy.

Coming to conclusions

However, as we have discussed above, while the eye can still detect color differences and color errors in the Blue region as small as 1 JNCD, for the most part we are less likely to notice or be troubled by much larger color differences and discrepancies with colors in this range compared with Skin Tone and Organic Colors.

The numerical results are listed in Table 1 above and the individual data points for each display are shown in Figure 3a. The Apple iPhone 6 Plus with 3. All of the other displays have significantly better accuracy, about 2.

The White Point All display colors except the three full saturation Red, Green, and Blue primary colors explicitly depend on the defined color of White, which is called the White Point, so it is especially important for the display to have a very accurate White Point.

The White Point clearly affects all of the lower saturation colors because they are relatively close to white.

Since Magenta is the furthest away from the White Point it changes the most, but all colors from low to high saturation are affected by the exact location of the White Point.

D65 is needed to produce accurate colors for digital photos, videos, TV, and internet content. However, many displays are set to a bluer White Point with a higher Color Temperature from 7, K. Many consumers are simply used to that white, and many actually prefer a bluish white for the background on text screens.

Unfortunately, that shifts all of the display colors and adds a bluish cast to all images, which may be quite noticeable with some Facial Skin Tones people will look more pale and with many Organic Colors.

Viewing Tests With large color variations of up to 10 JNCD between the displays shown in Figures 3a-cit was fairly easy to see some significant visual differences between all of the displays on many test photos and test images. None-the-less all six of these flagship displays for the most part have fairly good color accuracy for most casual viewing applications.Free Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions Worksheets.

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Few writers spell everything out clearly in their writing. In order for students to become strong readers and critical thinkers, they must learn to read between the lines. Jumping to conclusions (officially the jumping conclusion bias, often abbreviated as JTC, and also referred to as the inference-observation confusion) is a psychological term referring to a communication obstacle where one "judge[s] or decide[s] something without having all the facts; to reach unwarranted conclusions".

Apr 28,  · Coming to conclusions. Published on April 28, by theresecodd. So here we are, week 12 of the semester, the last week of classes. It seems like only yesterday I was getting lost in the Arts building, trying to locate this mysterious “Creating Digital Media” class.

That first class meeting lay the groundwork for a semester of. In the groups, social workers discussed the process of coming to a decision in care proceedings (where decisions are made about the future care of a child where there are concerns about the care provided in the family of origin).

"Come to a conclusion" and "reach a conclusion" are idioms, whereas "get to a conclusion" is not. " Jump to a conclusion " is also an idiom, but it means that the process of reaching the conclusion .

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