Teaching reflection essay

The organization of a reflective essay is very similar to other types of essays. An outline of a great reflective essay is laid out for your use below. Introductory Paragraph Your first paragraph should be an introduction in which you identify the subject and give the reader a general overview of the impression it made on you.

Teaching reflection essay

Truth is Stranger than Fiction Small Group Week Email Discussion Groups Class Presentations A note about reflection journals: Guidance is needed to help students link personal learning with course content. Personal Journal - Students will write freely about their experience. This is usually done weekly.

Teaching reflection essay

These personal journals may be submitted periodically to the instructor, or kept as a reference to use at the end of the experience when putting together an academic essay reflecting their experience.

Dialogue Journal - Students submit loose-leaf pages from a dialogue journal bi-weekly or otherwise at appropriate intervals for the instructor to read and comment on.

While labor intensive for the instructor, this can provide continual feedback to students and prompt new questions for students to consider during the semester. Highlighted Journal - Before students submit the reflective journal, they reread personal entries and, using a highlighter, mark sections of the journal Teaching reflection essay directly relate to concepts discussed in the text or in class.

This makes it easier for the instructor to identify the student to reflect on their experience in light of course content. Gary Hesser, Augsberg College 4. Key Phrase Journal - In this type of journal, students are asked to Teaching reflection essay terms and key phrases within their journal entries.

The instructor can provide a list of terms at the beginning of the semester or for a certain portion of the text. Students could also create their own list of key phrases to include. Journal entries are written within the framework of the course content and become an observation of how course content is evident in the service experience.

Double-entry Journal - When using a double-entry journal, students are asked to write one-page entries each week: Students describe their personal thoughts and reactions to the service experience on the left page of the journal, and write about key issues from class discussions or readings on the right page of the journal.

Students then draw arrows indicating relationships between their personal experiences and course content. This type of journal is a compilation of personal data and a summary of course content in preparation of a more formal reflection paper at the end of the semester.

Angelo and Cross 6.

Praxis: Kentucky

Critical Incident Journal - This type of journal entry focuses the student on analysis of a particular event that occurred during the week. By answering one of the following sets of prompts, students are asked to consider their thoughts and reactions and articulate the action they plan to take in the future: Describe a significant event that occurred as a part of the service-learning experience.

Why was this significant to you? What underlying issues societal, interpersonal surfaced as a result of this experience? How will this incident influence your future behavior? Another set of questions for a critical incident journal includes the following prompts: Describe an incident or situation that created a dilemma for you in terms of what to say or do.

What is the first thing you thought of to say or do? List three other actions you might have taken. Which of the above seems best to you now and why do you think this is the best response? Three-part Journal - Students are asked to divide each page of their journal into thirds, and write weekly entries during the semester.

In the top section, students describe some aspect of the service experience. In the middle of the page, they are asked to analyze how course content relates to the service experience. And finally, an application section prompts students to comment on how the experience and course content can be applied to their personal or professional life.

Give each student "postits" and ask them to write down all the feelings they had when they first heard about their service-learning requirement. After they finish the first question, have them write down all of the feelings they had when they experienced their first "field encounter.

Encourage them to write down as many different brainstormed thoughts as possible one for each card. Have three newsprint papers strategically located and taped to the walls around the classroom.

Have one with a large happy face, one with a sad face, and one with a bewildered face. Ask students to now place their words on the newsprint paper that closest fits their brainstormed feelings.

Then have them stand next to the newsprint that has most of their feelings.With our efficient and reliable essay writing service, you won't have any troubles with your assignments anymore. Don't worry about tight deadlines and difficult topics - our professional writers and trained to meet any requirements under any pressure with ease.

A Reflection On Teaching Philosophy Essay - , pp. - ). Furthermore, a constructivist-educator is one who undertakes efforts to understand students ' already established conceptions, and tailors learning-activities to build upon or challenge these ideas.

How to Qualify for Certification. For initial certification in Kentucky, all candidates must: Complete an approved educator preparation program; Pass the Praxis ® tests for their certification area ; Complete the Kentucky Teacher Internship Program.

2 REFLECTION SESSION CLASSROOM STRATEGIES: It is clear that the power in learning is in the action of doing the activity. Reflection provides the same power through the . Teaching students the value of deceleration and immersive attention. Help with Opening PDF Files.

Help your students children classify ideas and communicate more effectively. Use graphic organizers to structure writing projects, to help in problem solving, decision making, studying, planning research and brainstorming.

Kellee Young K-8 Elementary Teacher/Librarian: Final Reflective Essay on Teaching and Learning